Microscopy of sample from bottom of pot pond 11/11/2018

For last few months, I have been cultivating a “pond” in a large pot in my garden.

The following photos are taken from a sample from the bottom of this pond today, using my Leitz Laborlux 11 microscope and Bresser Microcam SP 5.1 camera, with x4, x10, x40 objectives.

The photos and video below are all based around highly magnified microscopy of the antennae/legs of a small 2-3mm crustacean I found in the sample. In particular, I focus on other animal life (single and multicellular) living on or around these structures.

Obj = microscope objective power.

Andy

Detail-crustacean-pot-pond-Leitz-Laborlux-11-x4-obj-111118:

See the small group of oval objects attached to the antenna on the right – I think this is a group of other organisms using the crustacean as a platform!

On the other two legs visible, note the nodular structure to the chiton exoskeleton. Plenty of hairs to be seen projecting from legs and antenna.

Those group of oval organisms are seen attached to the antenna at bottom of photo below (photo & video):

Antenna (below):

 

Detail-crustacean-pot-pond-Leitz-Laborlux-11-x10-obj-111118:

   Detail-crustacean-pot-pond-Leitz-Laborlux-11-x40-obj-111118:

These images show close ups of where the hairs arise from the chiton exoskeleton of the legs.

Rolling ball cells pot pond Leitz Laborlux 11 x10 obj 111118 (below):

Rolling ball cells pot pond Leitz Laborlux 11 x40 obj 111118 (photo and video):

Worm pot pond Leitz Laborlux 11 x4 obj 111118 (below, photos & video):

Worm pot pond Leitz Laborlux 11 x10 obj 111118 (below, photos & video):

 

Chloroplast movement in Elodea 11/11/2018

Elodea is a genus of 6 species of aquatic plants often called the waterweeds described as a genus in 1803. Elodea is native to North and South America and is also widely used as aquarium vegetation. It lives in fresh water (Wikipedia). Chloroplasts can move in all plants but are particularly visible in Elodea.

I used my Leitz Laborlux 11 microscope today to view a thin slice of Elodea leaf  with a bright light from the side to stimulate movement.

Andy

Video of chloroplast movement in Elodea, Leitz Laborlux 11 microscope, 40x objective:

 

Video of chloroplast movement in Elodea, Leitz Laborlux 11 microscope, 100x objective:

Photos:

x40 objective:

In the next photo, look carefully – there are many tiny organelles visible apart from the more obvious chloroplasts:

x100 objective:

Esprit 120

Esprit 120 Part 1

I decided to purchase this scope as it fits nicely in between the focal lengths of my other telescopes. I have read lots of reviews of the espirit range and quite honestly haven’t found any negativity at all. I purchased the scope from FLO and spent an extra little to have the scope optically bench tested. This will serve as an additional peace of mind and I’m really pleased I did so. 

On close inspection of the scope I can see this is a very high quality instrument with great attention to detail. 

It comes with all the connectors etc that you would require to start imaging right out of the box. I did purchase the field flattener at an additional cost as I plan to use it purely for imaging. If your doing visual astronomy the flattener isn’t required. I also received a m48 to canon adapter but not sure if this is normally included in uk sales or FLO just threw it in ? Either way very pleased ! 

The retractable dew shield is a great fit and works very well with the two screws to tighten over the tube. 

The focuser is of excellent quality and feels lovely to work it back and forth. The only other refractor I have is a takahashi Fsq 85 and I’d say this is of equal quality. The locking knob sits underneath the focuser. I wasn’t sure about the locking knob in the beginning as I’m used to using the screw type on the Fsq but this is growing on me and certainly locks things down tightly. 

I also like the camera orientation adjuster which enables you to quickly frame the object your imaging. Again slightly different to the Fsq but excellent. 

Visually the scope looks stunning with clean lines and I like the splash of green SkyWatcher have added to their scopes over recent months. 

The optics look awesome and I’m really looking forward to testing it out when the weather clears. I plan to use a full frame canon 6d to start with so this will be a real test of the scope/optics. Going by the look/feel of the scope I’m very confident it will pass with flying colours. 

Make no mistake this is a finely engineered scope, love it ! 

 

Pelican Nebula (Part 2)

Last week I posted an RGB image of the Pelican Nebula taken shortly after the full moon. The evening before (28/10) I’d had my first go at imaging with a Hydrogen Alpha filter, and a few murky evenings has given me the chance to process it and then learn how to feed it into the Red channel of the RGB image using Pixinsight. Updated image, along with the monochrome Halpha image, is below.

Really pleased with this output- because light pollution is suppressed by the filter I was able to expose for much longer (9 minutes per sub) and the red signal is correspondingly stronger. Once integrated into image you don’t have to “push” the software so hard to bring out the detail in the nebula.

My 2018 Solar System

I’ve been quiet for a while, largely due to car problems, hopefully behind me for now!

I’ve managed to image all the planets (except Earth and poor Pluto!) this year, although Uranus and Neptune were fuzzed up by poor seeing and Mercury is fairly random – I got a shot of it in the sunset above Barton under Needwood from the flyover on the A38! After darkening the background and resampling to three time bigger I was left with a red dot that is Mercury but I won’t pretend it’s ‘proper’ image.

 

Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.
Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.