Plant microscopy

Microscopy of Elodea pond weed, showing chloroplast and organelle movement 10/12/2019

Bright field

Live, unstained/unfixed

Andy

Firstly, an explanation about what is happening below:

From https://www.howplantswork.com/2010/04/25/chloroplast-movement-in-plant-cells-stirring-the-pot-avoiding-the-sun/

Movement of chloroplasts around the cell is called cyclosis or cytoplasmic streaming. Other organelles such as mitochondria are also streaming, along with the chloroplasts. This movement is on intracellular tracks called microfilaments, composed of actin proteins. The organelles are attached to the actin filaments by myosin, a motor protein. These proteins transform the chemical energy in ATP into mechanical energy leading to change in protein conformation and the protein molecule “walks” down the actin filament.

In leaf cells under bright sunlight, chloroplasts may have the ability to “move into the shade” of other chloroplasts, called photorelocation. Chloroplasts gather in areas irradiated with weak light to maximize photosynthesis (the accumulation response), and move away from areas irradiated with strong light to minimize damage of the photosynthetic apparatus (the avoidance response). The processes underlying these chloroplast movements can be divided into three parts: photoperception, signal transduction, and chloroplast movement.

Photos:

x40 objective:

x100 oil objective:      

Video:

x40 objective:

x100 oil objective:

Sap from leaf 6/1/2019

Following are photos from sap coming out of cut end of house plant leaf.

Zeiss IM microscope.

No stain.

Andy

x32 objective, Optovar x1 intermediate lens:

x63 objective, Optovar x1 intermediate lens:

x63 objective, Optovar x2 intermediate lens, some sharpening with unsharp mask in GIMP2:

x63 objective, Optovar x2 intermediate lens, further contrast and brightness enhanced in GIMP2:

Chloroplast movement in Elodea 11/11/2018

Elodea is a genus of 6 species of aquatic plants often called the waterweeds described as a genus in 1803. Elodea is native to North and South America and is also widely used as aquarium vegetation. It lives in fresh water (Wikipedia). Chloroplasts can move in all plants but are particularly visible in Elodea.

I used my Leitz Laborlux 11 microscope today to view a thin slice of Elodea leaf  with a bright light from the side to stimulate movement.

Andy

Video of chloroplast movement in Elodea, Leitz Laborlux 11 microscope, 40x objective:

 

Video of chloroplast movement in Elodea, Leitz Laborlux 11 microscope, 100x objective:

Photos:

x40 objective:

In the next photo, look carefully – there are many tiny organelles visible apart from the more obvious chloroplasts:

x100 objective: