Lunar

Sky watching in Flamborough, Yorkshire

Had a couple of chances to do some sky watching when on holiday last week. Mars was clearly visible when the sky cleared. It seemed that it took quite a while for the sky to get dark enough. The moon was looking good. I was able to look out of the velux window in the bedroom, and see the moon out there. On one evening the Milky Way was visible, not too clear, but you could tell it was there.

Newly processed version of my colour Moon data from 4/4/2020 – processed 4/10/2020

My skills in astrophotography processing have improved over time – so I decided to have another go at processing my colour Moon data from 4/4/2020, in order to see if I can get something I am happier with – I wanted to be able to show the mineral composition of different areas through their different colours.

Andy

First version has had some sharpening applied using Topaz Denoise:

Without using Denoise:

The moon and its terminator seen from Tamworth on 29th May 2020

 

I’ve been trying to take photographs of the moon at different stages. My intention is to label features on the terminator, when they can be viewed more clearly. It is quite amazing what a difference it makes to have features accentuated by the shadows.
Several club members were looking at the moon after our last virtual meeting. Heather suggested that we looked for ‘lunar v’ and ‘lunar x.’ I’ve processed the image that I took on that evening with my Canon Powershot SX720HS. I’m using a variety of resources to help identify features. The main one is ’21st Century Atlas of the Moon by Charles A. Wood and Maurice J. S. Collins. I’m sure I will have made mistakes, but I have found the whole process very educational. I’ve attached the pdf version of my efforts – click on this link – 7 days old 29th may 2020

Copernicus Crater

This is the Copernicus moon Crater I imaged last night with my skywatcher 250PDS, qhy5-ii mono and celestron X-Cel 2x barlow.

Captured 10,000 frames chose the best 10%. Image stabilised in Pipp and Stacked in Registacks.

Hand-held photos of lunar surface taken with Samsung S10+ phone through eyepiece on Orion 10 inch Dobsonian Telescope plus equatorial platform 29/5/2020

Hand-held photos of lunar surface taken with Samsung S10+ phone through eyepiece on Orion 10 inch Dobsonian Telescope plus equatorial platform 29/5/2020.

Lichfield, UK

Some of these using 3mm equivalent eyepiece – the equatorial platform really helps stabilise the image.

Andy