solargraphs

Solargraph

I took down the RAG Solargraph that had been in place on the front wall of my house all last year and finally got around to scanning it in.

It was scanned at 1200 DPI, the highest resolution available on my printer/scanner, then rotated and flipped.  It took a while for me to realise that the flip was necessary in order to work out what I was looking at.  Seems obvious, in hindsight!  Then I created a negative image (thereby making the negtive positive) and cropped the edge beyond the south-west as it contained nothing but the shadow of the house next door.

Here is the result.  Apart from the above, the image is not doctored in any way.  Playing around with colours and sharpness didn’t seem to add anything useful, so I’ve stayed with the original settings.  You can just make out the image of my campervan, slightly west of south.  I’ve a better view to the east, but couldn’t quite catch the sunrise itself.  Silhouettes of trees and houses are vsisble along the skyline.  The white dots are street lights and ‘security’ lights that couldn’t be avoided (short of covering the camera up over night, every night).

It was an interesting experiment and the result is actually better than I expected, so I’m quite pleased with this.

Derry North

Installing new solargraphs at LRO

Damian kindly delivered two new solargraphs yesterday and I installed these in my garden in Lichfield (LRO). Good job he gave me instructions to check the aperture after hammering in the stake – in one of them the paper turned around and covered the hole (hole looked white) so I had to take off top and move paper around again and re-tape it.

Andy

LRO Solargraph June-Dec 2017 processed at last 9/5/2018

It has taken me a long time to scan and process this solargraph from last six months of last year but eventually here it is – from the LRO garden, Lichfield.

You can see the path of Sun each day over those six months – in background are house and trees.

I am very grateful to Damian who made the solargraph and helped me process it but was kind enough to let me press the buttons! Actually, colour choices etc here are mine and it will be interesting to compare my attempt here with his when he posts his versions later this week.

Andy

Winter Solstice – Solargraph.

On the 21st June I set up my solargraph, this had a0.3mm laser drilled hole ( as supplied by the pinhole factory, also resistant to bird attack ( although I’ve had no problems previously)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was sat on the end of my raspberry canes on the allotment.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the 21st Dec I removed it , opened it up in a dark room with a red light and placed on Epson scanner, scanned at 1200dpi, in colour and saved as a .tif file for processing in Photoshop, see image below, had to repeat scan as first image contained some very strange artifacts, tinsely bits from scanning the Christmas card from Rosliston forestry centre!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then it was processed in Photoshop CS6, first flipping horizontally to put image right way round and then inverting the played with levels, curves contrast and exposure, final image below, with camera view for comparison beside it. ( enlarge solar graph, shows detail better.)

Happy Solstice- Pete Hill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A single day Solargraph.

Hi, quite a few people are running solargraphs (tin cans with pinholes containing photographic film) to capture the suns path between the Summer and Winter solstice. The one below was run for just one day.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a Solargraph of the Eclipse on Aug 21 2017 taken in Idaho, for full details go to:

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170922.html

It didn’t use photographic film but photosensitive paper, that you stop/ develop by immersing in water, the sort of thing you can get from Hawkins bazaar.!

Pete Hill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barton Solargraph.

Thanks to Damian for the spare piece of photographic paper (I’d run out), have now set up my solargraph on the support poles of my Raspberry bed on the allotment.

Instead of a “normal ” pinhole  I’ve attached a laser cut 0.3mm pinhole from the Pinhole factory ( google it)

The camera is pointing due south with a view over the sheds and trees on allotments as well as the National grid pylon, lets see what happened in 6 months time Dec 21st!

Check out Spaceweather.com ( 21st June 2017) for what to expect and further links to producing solargraphs.

Pete Hill