Rhys Thornett

Video from International Astronomy Show 2018 (12-13 October 2018)

This is video from the International Astronomy Show in Stoneleigh Park 12-13/10/2018.

Andy

Video from IAS 2018:

https://youtu.be/oo4wl7fMU0U

Other posts on the International Astronomy Show 2018 with photos and impressions on the event:

International Astronomy Show 2018 – Day One 12/10/2018: Talks & Impressions

International Astronomy Show 2018 Day One – 12/10/2018: Photos of vendor displays

International Astronomy Show 2018 – Day Two 13/10/2018

International Astronomy Show 2018 – Day Two 13/10/2018

Rhys and I came back to the International Astronomy Show today on day two. I attended yesterday but this was his first visit this year.

This follows on from Geoff’s and my posts from yesterday:

International Astronomy Show 2018 – Day One 12/10/2018: Talks & Impressions

International Astronomy Show 2018 Day One – 12/10/2018: Photos of vendor displays

See also video from day two:

Video from International Astronomy Show 2018 (12-13 October 2018)

Rhys and I opted to attend two talks – one by David Bryant and another by Allan Chapman.

David’s talk was a fascinating exploration of different types of meteorites and their history.

 

Welding an acrylic diffuser tube for homemade compact flourescent bulb spectrometer calibration lamp

Not sure how well this is going to turn out…

Rhys and I have had a go tonight at welding two pieces of acrylic together to create a diffuser tube for our homemade calibration lamp.

Acrylic welding involves using a solvent to soften the plastic so it melts together along the weld and form a single piece of plastic.

Andy

Site of the Peter Bolas Observatory 27/5/2018

Heather told us all on Friday night that building of the new Peter Bolas Observatory at Rosliston Forestry Centre will start soon. It has taken such a long time to get to this point. The family and I (Hannah, Ean Ean, and Rhys) felt this was a good time to record what the site looks like prior to the start of building for prosperity!

The observatory is going to be build on the corner of the archery field near the bird of prey centre and next to the tree trail and large sundial, and not far from the café and seminar room.

Andy

Visit to Herschel Museum in Bath

Ean Ean, Rhys and Hannah and I visited the Herschel Astronomy in Bath on the way back from a weekend trip to Wells. The Herschel Museum of Astronomy at 19 New King Street, Bath, England, is located in a preserved town house that was formerly the home of William Herschel and his sister Caroline. Its patron is Queen’s Brian May and the introductory video is narrated by Patrick Moore. It was from this house, using a telescope of his own design that William discovered the planet Uranus in 1781, and below are some pictures from the garden from which this observation was made. The photos are from our visit today.

The objects in the pictures below are in some cases the Herschels’ own or those of people close to them. Other aspects of the house are re-creations to give idea of what life was like when the Herschels lived there, including items from the same era.

Andy, Ean Ean, Rhys and Hannah

 

Stoney Littleton Long Barrow

Ean Ean, Rhys, Hannah and I visited the Stoney Littleton Long Barrow, on our way to visit the Herschel Astronomy Museum (see next post for our visit to that museum). A long barrow is a prehistoric monument dating to the early Neolithic period. They are rectangular or trapezoidal tumuli or earth mounds traditionally interpreted as collective tombs. The Stoney Littleton Long Barrow (also known as Bath Tumulus and the Wellow Tumulus) is a Neolithic chambered tomb with multiple burial chambers, located near the village of Wellow, Somerset. It is an example of the Severn-Cotswold tomb. The barrow is about 30 metres (98 ft) in length and 15 metres (49 ft) wide at the south-east end, it stands nearly 3 metres (10 ft) high. Internally it consists of a 12.8 metres (42 ft) long gallery with three pairs of side chambers and an end chamber. There is a fossil ammonite decorating the left-hand door jamb. The site was excavated by John Skinner in 1816-17 who gained the entry through a hole originally made about 1760. The excavation revealed the bones (some burned) of several individuals (https://www.heritagedaily.com/2017/11/seven-must-see-long-barrows-in-england/100889).

A south-east north-west orientation is very common for Mendip barrows (http://www.ubss.org.uk/resources/proceedings/vol24/UBSS_Proc_24_3_187-206.pdf). A discussion of possible Stoney Littleton Long Barrow Winter Solstice Alignment can be found at https://www.silentearth.org/stoney-littleton-long-barrow-winter-solstice-alignment/

Andy, Ean Ean, Rhys and Hannah

             

Microscopy sample taken from edge of lake at Branston Water Park 20/2/2018 viewed 22/2/2018

Damian collected this sample 20/2/2018 when Andy & Damian went there. In the previous post, we described how we centrifuged this sample to get it ready for microscopy. In this post, we show microscopic images from the slides we produced.

  • Bresser Mikrocam 5.0 camera.
  • Zeiss IM microscope.

Andy & Rhys & Damian

Photo of large ciliated organism x20 objective bright field:

Photos x32 objective – mixture bright field and Phase Contrast images showing bacteria, diatoms, and something I don’t know!

Videos – Phase Contrast x32 objective: