Astrophotography – solar system

Mineral Moon from 29th December

Here’s a picture of last night’s full moon. I’ve spent a good part of the today learning some new processing techniques from the page below:

How To Photograph And Edit a Mineral Moon | Light Stalking

Unfortunately the steps are all in Photoshop, so I had to work out how to do them in GIMP, but it seems to have worked. I wanted to see if I could do this entirely in free software, but couldn’t get the noise reduction to work so there’s a bit of Pixinsight in here, but otherwise it’s all done with free stuff.

Capture details are: Canon DSLR on 130PDS – Disc is stack of 30 of 1/500s, halo is a single jpeg at 1/10 sec

Processing is: Converted to avi by Pipp, stacked in Autostakkert, Saturation and Layers in GIMP and Noise reduction in Pixinsight MLT.

 

 

 

Great Conjunction

A major miscalculation meant I had to abandon my ADC and my x3 barlow, a terrible same as I could have had a really good close image of the planets within the frame 🙁

In retrospect I should have imaged them separately with my usual setup, then taken a ‘;key image’ without the barlow to overlay them on. I’ll be ready again in 600 years time…

Without my ADC the red and green images of Jupiter were a bit stretched making it look a bit oval 🙂 Still I reckon better than the pics the BBC and the Guardian were using 😎

Great Conjunction
Great Conjunction

Grand Conjunction Jupiter and Saturn 20/12/2020

Not a great photo but I caught it at least!

Predicted to be cloudy on 21/12/2020, the night of closest approach (which turned out to be correct), I opted to go out night before.

Blobby because I used Sky Watcher Equinox 80mm and Altair Astro 183M to take this photo (single frame) rather than my SkyMax 180mm + planetary video camera (which had been plan but planetary pair so low in sky close to roof of neighbouring house than I went for safety with something I could guarantee).

Andy

Some Marseses…

… as Gollum might put it.

Reprocess of my data from 13 September,

Mars
Mars

 

From Thursday last week:

More Mars
More Mars

And the day after, Friday at Rosliston, the seeing wasn’t as good and Mars wasn’t as high in the sky:

Mars
Mars

All with the same equipment, so sometimes it’s just down to the conditions… Andy’s to be congratulated for getting recognisable images on his first go under such poor seeing.