Observing 17-18 th October.

Swadlincote 17-18/9/18 Vixen 102 on heq5pro pro mount.

What 4″ of aperture in light pollution can do.

It is a constant source of amazement and pleasure to observe targets from here. We are surrounded by some nine streetlights , neighbours with security lights and no curtains. Using poles and dark throws has quartered off an observing area. It’s also on the hedgehog highway, they have been known to trundle past through the tripod legs.

The night started very favourably with Saturn below a low yellowish Moon. Mars was still wobbling. It was great to set up about eight and finish about two. Some beautiful targets. I haven’t done the research on their stories yet.

It’s often enjoyable just to look at them. I turned to Cygnus as it passed the zenith and again caught NGC 6811 , ” the hole in the cluster” . There was good dark sky action with M27, the blue snowball, Eastern Veil and even a core to NGC 7331.

Here’s a few targets off the beaten track.

Lacerta gives the most stunning background , set in the stream of the Milky Way. Of the open clusters , NGC 7209 is an old favourite. There are some pretty delicate pairs in NGC 7394 and NGC 7245.

Onto a few binaries here , the inline h ( Herschel)1735 being triple. I was very surprised to catch a tiny field star next to the pair of 8 Lacertae. 13 Lacertae is a ticklish challenge.

Then a Star Trek to the northern constellations. NGC 7510 in Cepheus is a wondrous cluster. There is a dusty triangle at low power, like fairy dust ! NGC 7686 gave a beautiful bright shape in Andromeda. I started on the Perseus binaries . Straight away theta Persei gave the most challenging tiny spec of a companion. ΟΣ 81 and DOO 7 I caught in the same view.

No great aperture here (4″), no great magnification , going from x42 to x77 with one at x182. Next time out it’ll be trying out the Baader astrometric eyepiece, to verify some separations and ensure the capture of those elusive faint multiples, under ,

clear skies ! Nick.

M34 multiple stars.

when you look at M34 it’s most appealing feature is the mass of multiple stars on view. I have details of those in M44. Open clusters are mainly young stars .

New stars are formed in the gas and debris loaded arms of spiral galaxies, you can observe new stars in the Trapezium of the Orion Nebula.In the early universe star formation gave a ratio of binaries to triples of 60:40. Later this evolved into a ratio of 65 binary : 25 triple : 35 singles. Gravitation pulls apart open clusters , one of the biggest we can see is Ursa Major . The whole of the plough is a moving cluster apart from the first and last star.

I got the whole wide view , but found a more detailed drawing showing the main multiple stars. Just using a 4″ scope , these are very accessible.

Next time I”lol use some more magnification to get these stars and increase the contrast. I also had look at Sigma Cassiopeiae, a lovely delicate view, under clear skies ! Nick.

Message from George – Greek astronomer from Skopelos

Hi Folks

I had a reply from George Mihail that I met in greece. It’s worth having a look at his website. Very interesting setup, a great view. The last photo is the latest live feed from his webcam at 1711 15th september. If you read further down, the english translation of my message is at the bottom

 

I

Dear friend
We manage to communicate and to take pictures of every activity of the stargate we have a very interesting winter here in Skopelos.Thanks with the best wishesGeorge Michail

https://www.facebook.com/george.michail.16

http://volnet.gr/home/index.html

——-Original Message——-

From: ed.mann@btinternet.com

Date: 12/9/2018 9:18:21 μμ

To: george@volnet.gr

Subject: Αστρονομία στη Σκόπελο (Astronomy in Skopelos)

Γεια Σας  Γεώργιος , το όνομά μου είναι Ed, σας μίλησα στη Σκόπελο πριν από λίγες εβδομάδες στο φεστιβάλ. Είμαι ο αστρονόμος από την Αγγλία.

Μου άρεσε να μιλάω μαζί σας και με ενδιέφερε πολύ να μάθω ότι έχετε ένα παρατηρητήριο στο νησί. Θα ήθελα να έρθω και να το δω την επόμενη φορά που θα είμαι εκε

Είμαι μέλος της Ομάδας Αστρονομίας Rosliston που συναντάει κοντά στο Burton on Trent στην Αγγλία (http://www.roslistonastronomy.org.uk/)

Αν κοιτάξετε την Αρχική σελίδα, εγώ είμαι στην πρώτη φωτογραφία (μπλε παλτό) και την 5η φωτογραφία (λευκό πουλόβερ). Μάλλον θα με αναγνωρίσεις από αυτό

Έχω επισυνάψει ορισμένες φωτογραφίες που πήρα. Ήταν τόσο ωραίο να βλέπετε κάποιον άλλον να κάνει δημόσια εκδηλώσεις προβολής. Κάνουμε αρκετά στο κλαμπ μας

Είπα σε άλλα μέλη για το γεγονός της Σκοπέλου και ήταν πολύ ζηλιάρης για το πόσο καθαρός ήταν ο ουρανός

Θα ήταν καλό να μοιράζεστε μαζί σας πληροφορίες και φωτογραφίες, αν θέλετε, και αν έρχεστε ποτέ στο Ηνωμένο Βασίλειο, θα ήσαστε πολύ ευπρόσδεκτοι να έρθετε στις συναντήσεις του συλλόγου μας

Θα σας δούμε το επόμενο έτος το 2019

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

My Greek is not very good so I have written it again in English just in case

Hi George, My name is Ed, I spoke to you in Skopelos a few weeks ago at the festival. I am the astronomer from England

It was great talking to you and I was very interested to know you have an observatory on the island. I woiuld like to come and see it next time I’m there

I’m a member of the Rosliston Astronomy Group that meets near Burton on Trent in the UK   (http://www.roslistonastronomy.org.uk/)

If you look at the Home page, that’s me in the 1st  photo (blue coat) and the 5th photo (white jumper). You’ll probably recognise me from that

I have attached some photos that I took . It was so nice to see someone else doing public outreach events. We do quite a few in our club

I told the other members about the Skopelos event and they were very jealous of how clear the sky was

It would be good to share information and pictures with you if you’d like, and if you ever come to the UK, you’d be very welcome to come to our club meetings

Bye for now

 

Ionize Calcium / Better Than H-alpha?

This post (http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=148025&PHPSESSID=ufu9aq45u6ht3gl4rhuesc8jj2)

is entitled “Ionize Calcium / Better Than H-alpha?”

Not sure I’m convinced!

Compare with this a day earlier –  http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=147977&PHPSESSID=ufu9aq45u6ht3gl4rhuesc8jj2

(same as this: https://roslistonastronomy.uk/nice-prominences-this-morning-13-09-2018)

Need to see Ha and Ca-K at the same time. Pete? Andy?

Interestingly, although we have no sunspots, prominences are fairly abundant.

“Bogardus” , out of the glare.

12/9/18 Swadlincote.

A visit from a friend bearing his 120 ed Equinox and clearing dark skies. The clarity and sharpness of the views was astounding. One example which really opened out was the multiple “Bogardus”, theta (θ) Aurigae. Easily spotted by eye , put some magnification to it,

W. Hershel spotted the wide companion. There is a close companion which pops out of the primary diffraction disc.

The primary is 285 x brighter than Sol, giving a radius of x5.4 greater. It has a magnetic field a thousand times that of Earth. It’s 175 light years distant , the B companion( same size as Sol) is 185 AU distant and has a 1200 year orbit.The distant companion is not gravitationally bound.

It’s a delight to catch the close companion as the main star is 75 times brighter ! We caught this initially at very lower power , this is at x138,

Nick.

Spectra taken with CCDSPEC Spectrometer @ Rosliston Forestry Centre RAG meeting 14/9/2018

I demonstrated my CCDSPEC spectrometer at the mid-monthly RAG meeting at the Forestry Centre tonight.

Andy

CCDSPEC Spectrometer:

The following spectra were all taken using the CCDSPEC spectrometer during the RAG meeting. The spectra are direct from the CCDSPEC spectrometer without telescope or other optical aid.

I started by taking a spectrum of one of the long fluorescent ceiling bulbs in the building (below):

For comparison the following is a spectrum I took from a compact fluorescent bulb in our study on 3/8/2018 (below). The same lines are clearly evident:

The following is another comparison spectrum from Wikipedia – I have labelled it with the wavelengths of the main lines:

I then took a spectrum of my calibration light made from the neon bulb in a RELCO starter bulb:

We also compared the above to a spectrum from the LED projector at the forestry centre (below):

Ed Mann came up with the idea that lasers might work well as calibration lights.

He had two laser pens with him – blue and green – so we tried taking a spectrum of those laser pens reflected off a white piece of paper (below):