Observing Forecast

Observing Forecasts for our area

 

Rosliston Forestry Centre:

http://clearoutside.com/forecast/52.75/-1.64

Lichfield:

http://clearoutside.com/forecast/52.69/-1.81

https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/2644531

https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/forecast/gcqewq76c#?date=2018-05-18

http://7timer.org/index.php?product=astro&lon=-1.807&lat=52.7&lang=en&ac=0&unit=metric&tzshift=0&site=

Burton-on-Trent:

http://clearoutside.com/forecast/52.81/-1.64

Tamworth:

http://clearoutside.com/forecast/52.63/-1.69

Summer blast.

Some ace targets as we look into our galaxy, include the Cygnus clusters. Lucky to get a decent view of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter. It seems to have developed a long fine streamer. There is also a noticeable barge to the northern belt.

Plenty of planetary nebulae around. In Cygnus and Delphinus  , two specials. NGC 6826 , the “blinking planetary ” which blinks vividly in and out .All bright planetaries do this trick , but this is the best one ! NCC 6905, the ” blue flash”  catch it right and it is a vivid blue. Not a time for galaxies , but I keep a note for later on as the Summer Triangle is with us into late autumn.Nick.

 

Great Hercules !

At last , Jupiter settled to give some x150 magnification views, lovely crisp bands and shading. An aperture mask is as good as anything to take off any brightness. Taken to using a large notebook instead of sheets of paper .

Hercules and Serpens are well placed. M5 is a spectacular globular cluster, however the night belonged to “Graff’s Cluster”, IC 4756. A beautiful scattering of stars , filling the eyepiece.

As it didn’t get much darker to midnight , I returned to some of the finest binaries in Hercules. OΣ 341 gives a lovely view of this multiple group , almost like an open cluster. Sarin is probably my favourite here. Expect to use some averted vision to get some of the faintest companions in summer skies. A bit more magnification will darken the field of view, under

clear skies ! Nick.

Hercules , summer views.

Something different from M13 and M92. The two planetary nebulae are very bright and obvious at low power . They both blink into invisibility and return , great to show everyone. Look for the bright , but fuzzy nebulae, focus on the stars, these won’t focus. Higher magnification shows more of the halo and core, but I like the contrast at low power.

NGC 6210 “Turtle nebula” some great excitement as this was one of the first Hubble images , taken to be a turtle eating a shell ! Discovered by Wilhelm Struve looking for binaries. To the south east there is the binary Σ 2016, separated by 7.4″.

“Webb’s Wreath ” is a magnificent ring like asterism. (SAO 85678)

NGC 6229 is a globular cluster some 99,000 light years on the galactic halo.

Very pleased to get these in bright summer and

clear skies ! Nick.

 

Observing and… ‘Observatories’…

Firstly, two moon shots (on successive), mornings no less…

Wed 9th May @ 4.46am, looking out of the bedroom window.

Nikon D3 and Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII

ISO200, 1/30sec, f/4. Processed in Adobe Lightroom CC and Photoshop CC 2017

…and again on Thu 10th May 4.55am, looking out of the bedroom window – caught a very lucky break in almost solid clouds!

Nikon D3 and Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII

ISO200, 1/50sec, f/4. Processed in Adobe Lightroom CC and Photoshop CC 2017

Photographing future auction ‘lots’ at work, I came across these Lilliput Lane ornaments…

This is a replica of The Great Equatorial, part of Flamsteed House. Originally commissioned in 1857 by the then Astronomer Royal, Sir George Biddell, it forms part of The Old Royal Observatory at Greenwich.

The Observatory dates from 1675 when it was commissioned by King Charles 2nd.

And… The Old Royal Observatory, Greenwich, London. Released to celebrate the Millennium.

So another of my ‘something a bit different’ threads!

Happy Observing!

Damian