Crepuscular rays in shadow from Lichfield

Seen in Lichfield this evening at about 9:15pm from vantage point next to Tescos.

Crepuscular rays /krɪˈpʌskjʊlər/ (more commonly known as sunbeams, sun rays, or god rays), in atmospheric optics, are rays of sunlight that appear to radiate from the point in the sky where the sun is located. (Wikipedia)

You can see the shadows of these rays from above the cloud near the sun.

Samsung S7 phone.

Andy

Saturn, 10 July 2018

Last night I finally got the ADC ‘dialled’ properly and also got the knack of the edge-detect focus tool in Sharpcap, which works really well for Saturn, which has lots of edges to detect!

I also finally worked out that to get good results with x3 drizzle in Autostakkjrt!3 you must use un-debayered data, as otherwise it just enhances the bayer pattern.

I’m pleased with this one, my best ring detail to date!

 

Saturn 10 July 18
Saturn 10 July 18

Sun 09/07/2018 – – – New facula

Yesterday, Spaceweather said:

“WHITE SUNSPOT: This weekend, observers of the sun have been waiting for something to emerge over the sun’s eastern limb. We knew it was there because of a farside solar flare on July 6th. Today it arrived, and it appears to be a white sunspot.

The correct name of this phenomenon is “faculae.” It is a cousin of sunspots.

Regular dark sunspots are magnetic islands on the surface of the sun. Magnetic fields in these areas are thousands of times stronger than Earth’s magnetic field. Sunspot magnetic fields are so strong, they block the flow of heat from the nuclear furnace below. They appear dark because they are relatively cool compared to their surroundings.

Faculae are also made of magnetic fields. However, the magnetism of faculae is concentrated in much smaller bundles than in sunspots. Instead of blocking heat from below, they essentially form corridors that allow us to see into sun’s hot interior, creating an apparent bright spot on the surface of the sun.

It is still possible that a dark core will follow these faculae over the limb in the hours ahead, establishing the region as a normal sunspot group. Stay tuned.” 

 

This is what it looked like this morning.

Nice prominences and “filaprom” too.

For some reason, I reckon this one looks better in colour.