Astrophotography – solar (Sun)

Sun today – (or a discussion with Amun-Ra) 11/06/2018

Following some recent complaints from RAG members concerning the lack of solar features (you know who you are), I decided to talk to my friend Amun-Ra, with whom I have a “special relationship”, about this. Mr Ra protested that he had been “ripped off” for years by people with cheap telescopes on window-sills without any reciprocal concessions, when everyone knows you have to go outside with expensive optics in order to pay Him full respect.  However, he agreed to making some small features visible for a limited time only, as he had to rush off to negotiate with a minor god of the underworld to try to de-nuclearise the solar system.

So I quickly got these (relatively poor) images early this morning when the sun was at a very oblique angle to the double glazing. I felt it necessary to do this before finding out Mr Ra had changed his mind on his twitter-feed.

(For those unfamiliar with ancient Egyptian gods, Ra was the sun god, Amun was the king of the gods, and they were later merged to become Amun-Ra. I’m sure there can’t be any modern parallels – – – )

A Full Moon…

Away in Wales at the moment and regretting not bringing a scope (this wold have been so much better); but here’s a picture of tonight’s full moon taken through a 300mm zoom lens. A bit of a crop, but no other editing- the reddish colour is a reflection of the sunset.

Looks good through the 12×70 binoculars as well!

Rob Leonard

Solar observing in Streethay

Whilst the sun shone in Windsor for the royal wedding, it also shone here in Lichfield! Damian and I set up our telescopes with Daystar Quack (sorry meant to say QUARK – I think it was the automatic text correction on my Samsung!) Hydrogen Filters to capture three magnificent prominence on the edge of the solar disc – at approx 3 o’clock, 6 o’clock and 9 o’clock on the disc (location not time viewing feld of view as clock face) in our scopes with diagonals.

I used my Sky Watcher 80mm Equinox Pro and 8-24  zoom eyepiece on Manfrotto tripod. Damian used his Takahashi with 40mm, 32mm or 25mm Televue Plossls on Nova Hitch mount. The Tak has longer focal length than the Sky Watcher so it was appropriate to use longer focal length eyepieces.

Andy & Damian

The photos below were taken at approx. 14:50 (time BST) today through my Sky Watcher 80mm Equinox Pro on Manfrotto mount with my Samsung S7 smartphone camera hand held to eyepiece.

Prominence at ca. 3 o’clock on clock face of field of view:

     

Prominence at 6 o’clock:

Prominence at 9 o’clock:

The following is taken using Samsung through Damian’s Takahashi on Novohitch mount at 15:34. It shows evolution of the 9 o’clock prominence:

The following shows evolution of the 3 o’clock prominence so that it shows three rather than previous two projections up from solar surface. Also through Damian scope:

And the next picture a solar filament on the solar surface – although it is faint and difficult to pick out, again in the Takahashi:

Part of the solar disc seen through Quark Calcium-H filter in the Takahashi – not much detail but difficult to judge because these are apparently good with sun spots but we don’t have any to look at today!

The following image taken with Samsung S7 phone through my 80mm Equinox at 16:20 with 8mm eyepiece on Quark of the 9 o’clock prominence when seeing deteriorated for a while. First version is without processing and second some processing to bring out contrast using curves:

The next images were taken about 16:25 of the 2 o’clock prominence. Damian thought it had 4 projections now – the camera in both cases has only just caught the fourth faint one between one on right and two on left – just goes to show that the human eye can integrate over time and sometimes pick up detail that cameras might find difficult to see. Later, Damian took a hand held photo within his iPhone when seeing picked up and it did indeed show four projections!

Through 80mm Equinox when seeing improved – four projections now visible:

Through Takahashi:

Back to the Takahashi again but now using 25mm eyepiece to show more detail on the 9 o’clock prominence:

A great afternoon’s observing!